Plates: Jucy's Hamburgers

(Texas Highways, September 2017)

East Texas' Jucy's Hamburgers aims for the win.

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Hit the Road: Tyler Texas

(Texas Highways, September 2017)

With a waggle of his pen, U.S. President John Tyler signed a bill to bring Texas into the United States in 1845. The following year, the state legislature approved a town in his honor in upper east Texas.Since then, Tyler has grown into a thriving city of more than 100,000 souls.

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Hunt County Heroes

(Texas Highways, February 2017)

The Audie Murphy / American Cotton Museum in Greenville.

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Nature by Day...or Night

(Texas Highways, October 2016)

Guided night hikes at Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area.

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A Campus in the Cloud

(AMP, Sep/Oct 2015)

In October 2015, the University of Arkansas System will launch a new, wholly online college named eVersity. Its backers want to raise the educational bar for the state, but can they do that without triggering infighting with UA System campuses that already have their own online presence?

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Gimme That Old-Time Opry

(Texas Highways, August 2015)

Country music traditions live on at two Texarkana opries.

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The Incentives Game

(AMP, May/June 2015)

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Camden's War Economy

(Arkansas Money & Politics, Mar/Apr 2015)

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State Minimum Wage Increase

(Arkansas Money & Politics, Jan/Feb 2015)

Will the impact match the intent?

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Coming Clean has its Challenges

(Arkansas Money & Politics, Sept/Oct 2014)

Are proposed regulations on power plants a step towards cleaner air or just a "war on coal?"

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Predicting the Next Financial Collapse

(TexasMonthly.com, May 2013)

J. Kyle Bass, a Dallas-based investor, forecasted the mortgage bubble and the European collapse, but what happens if his third prediction comes true?

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Great Expectations: Tom Cotton's bright GOP future

(Arkansas Life, January 2013)

Imagine a Republican mad scientist designing an ideal candidate. He might combine the youth of Marco Rubio, the down-home style of George W. Bush, the brains of William F. Buckley and the bravery of John McCain. The result might be something like Tom Cotton, the new congressman from Arkansas' 4th district.

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Lottery Limbo: In the throes of funding woes

(Arkansas Life, January 2013)

The honeymoon is over. The Arkansas lottery has awarded more than $250,000 in scholarships since being approved by voters in 2008, but revenues have declined as the novelty has faded.

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Congresswoman Biggert: Education equips insurance consumers to make sound decisions

(Bankrate, 2010/2011)

Rarely has insurance been a hotter topic in Washington D.C. One of the people at the center of this political whirlwind is U.S. Rep. Judy Biggert, R-Ill.

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Why is Colorado's Fort Collins the Safest City for Drivers

(Bankrate, 2010/2011)

Fort Collins, Colorado has more to brag about than historic buildings and scenic mountain views. The city ranked as America's safest for driving in 2010, according to Allstate Insurance.

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A Long Wave Goodbye

(Fusion, September 2009)

It was a cold morning in Siberia on September 17, 1938. A broken man stood helpless in front of a firing squad. A single command was shouted, a series of shots were fired...and then silence fell.

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Deregulation and Its Effect on Glen Rose

(Glen Rose Newspaper, January 11, 2007)

In the tranquil countryside north of Glen Rose, behind concrete walls three feet thick, the building blocks of the universe are carefully broken apart. This activity generates fierce heat. It boils water and spins turbines, electrifying the power lines that feed into our homes, schools and places of business.

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Speaking of Texas: Harlon Block

(Texas Highways, June 2004)

Upon graduating from Weslaco High in 1942, star football player Harlon Block, along with 12 other seniors from the team, enlisted in the Marine Corps. Three years later, Corporal Block climbed Mt. Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima as part of the team assigned to raise the Stars and Stripes, so that, as the squad's leader put it, "every marine on this cruddy island can see it."

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